Ivan Shishkin – “Czar of the Forest”

4K Shares

“Russia – country of landscapes… I hope the time will come, when all Russian nature, alive and penetrated by spirit, will look from canvases of Russian artists…” Ivan Shishkin

Few have captured nature’s delicate beauty like Ivan Shishkin. A Russian master who tasted the rare fruits of an artist’s success but also bitter tragedy. I cover:

Ivan Shishkin, Pine Forest, 1895
Ivan Shishkin, Pine Forest, 1895

Key Facts and Ideas

Here are some key facts and ideas I found interesting. Refer to the resources linked at the end of this post if you want to dive deeper:

  • He was a man of many nicknames: “Czar of the Forest”, “The Bear”, “Titan of the Russian Forest”, “Old Pine Tree”, and “Lonely Oak”
  • Shishkin’s art journey began at an early age with a pencil in hand. Below is one of his early self-portraits.
Ivan Shishkin, Self-Portrait, 1854
Ivan Shishkin, Self-Portrait, 1854
  • He attended the First Kazan gymnasium-a prestigious school for academics. I assume his parents planned for him to graduate and join his father’s grain trade business. But Shishkin had his sight set on becoming an artist.
  • At first, his parents dismissed his artistic aspirations, so he drew alone at night, under candlelight (Russian Art Gallery). Eventually, his parents relaxed their grasp.
  • His formal art training began in 1852, enrolling in the Moscow School of Painting and subsequently the Imperial Academy of Arts. He graduated from the Imperial Academy with a gold medal for View of Valaam Island (below) and a scholarship to paint in Europe.
Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1860
Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1860
  • He was a member of Peredvizhniki, a group of Russian realist artists who rejected the Imperial Academy’s rigid approach and sought to make art more accessible to the public. The group included Isaac Levitan, Ilya Repin, Alexei Savrasov, Valentin Serov, and Emily Shanks. The group is pictured below, with Shishkin circled.
Peredvizhniki (Shishkin Circled)
  • He married Evgenia Vassilyev in 1868 (featured in the painting below). Her brother Fyodor was also a remarkable landscape painter and trained under Shishkin.
Ivan Shishkin, In Front of the Mirror. Reading the Letter, 1870
Ivan Shishkin, In Front of the Mirror. Reading the Letter, 1870
  • 1874 marked the start of a long string of tragic events. His father, his wife, his student Fyodor, and his two sons all died over a short period (I was unable to find specifics). Shishkin later remarried one of his students, Olga Lagoda, who died after the birth of their daughter. Life can be cruel…
  • Despite the tragedies, he continued to paint and improve. His Morning in a Pine Forest made Shishkin a household name in Russia. But credit where credit’s due: it was Konstantin Savitsky who came up with the idea and added the four bears to the painting. Without such an addition, this would have been just another-albeit stunning-Shishkin landscape.
Ivan Shishkin, Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889
Ivan Shishkin, Morning in a Pine Forest, 1889

Below is Shishkin’s study for the painting. A charming work of art in its own right.

Ivan Shishkin, Morning in a Pine Forest. Sketch, 1889
Ivan Shishkin, Morning in a Pine Forest. Sketch, 1889
  • His success was not without criticism. His contemporaries deemed him to be more of a craftsman than a “real” artist.
  • His final painting was Mast-Tree Grove (below). It exhibited at the Imperial Russian Museum’s grand opening in March 1898. Shishkin could not attend due to illness. He died the morning after at his easel, in the hands of a student (Russian Art Gallery). A fitting way for an artist to go. He was 66.
Ivan Shishkin, Mast-Tree Grove, 1898
Ivan Shishkin, Mast-Tree Grove, 1898

Drawing, Brushwork, and Technique

Much of Shishkin’s success can be attributed to his formal training and rigorous drawing practice. As Joaquín Sorolla put it:

“The older I become, the more I realize that drawing is the most important of all the problems of picture-making.”

Below are some of his drawings:

Ivan Shishkin, Self-Portrait, 1886
Ivan Shishkin, Self-Portrait, 1886
Ivan Shishkin, Part of the Trunk of a Pine, 1890
Ivan Shishkin, Part of the Trunk of a Pine, 1890

Shishkin also mastered the art of etching. Below are two examples: a detailed forest and an album cover.

Ivan Shishkin, Etching, Vacation in the Woods, 1865
Ivan Shishkin, Etching, Vacation in the Woods, 1865
Ivan Shishkin, Etching, Album Cover, 1886
Ivan Shishkin, Etching, Album Cover, 1886

For the most part, he avoided the “plastic” appearance that often comes with such refined realism. You can see what I am referring to in his early work, like View of Valaam Island. It looks realistic, but not natural.

Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1858
Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1858

His later work is more sophisticated. Refer to Off the Coast of the Gulf of Finland. Much more controlled with his use of color and detail. It reminds me of Sir Author Streeton’s work, though Streeton was more of an Impressionist.

Ivan Shishkin, Off the Coast of the Gulf of Finland (Adrias Near Narva), 1889
Ivan Shishkin, Off the Coast of the Gulf of Finland (Adrias Near Narva), 1889

Color and Light

Shishkin’s use of color was naturalistic (he painted what he saw). Unlike, say, Claude Monet who painted in a high-key, or Vincent van Gogh who painted how he felt.

A typical theme of his work is sunlight bursting through a dense tree canopy, scattering over the forest floor. Refer to A Coniferous Forest. Sunny Day below. Some key observations:

  • The strong light in the distance helps pull you through the painting.
  • The shadowed foreground reiterates the dense nature (light struggles to get through).
  • Warm lights contrast against cool shadows.
Ivan Shishkin, A Coniferous Forest. Sunny Day, 1895
Ivan Shishkin, A Coniferous Forest. Sunny Day, 1895

Below is another example. Notice how the lights are a touch warmer than the darks. The greens, in particular, are much closer to yellow; whilst the greens in shadow are closer to blue.

Ivan Shishkin, Beach Forest in Switzerland, 1863
Ivan Shishkin, Beach Forest in Switzerland, 1863

As you would expect from the “Czar of the Forest”, Shishkin mastered the use of green. Refer to Deadwood and Goutweed Grass below. Few artists can get away with using such intense greens without it appearing jarring and gnash.

Ivan Shishkin, Deadwood, 1893
Ivan Shishkin, Deadwood, 1893
Ivan Shishkin, Goutweed Grass, 1885
Ivan Shishkin, Goutweed Grass, 1885

Here is one of Shishkin’s lighter paintings and a great demonstration of dappled light.

Ivan Shishkin, Near the Cottages, 1894
Ivan Shishkin, Near the Cottages, 1894

Composition

Shishkin’s work features many of the classic “rules” of composition-S-shapes, simplified masses, quiet and active areas, etc.

In Misty Morning, the river creates an S-shape that leads you into and around the painting. Also, notice the use of simplification to depict the misty background.

Ivan Shishkin, Misty Morning, 1897
Ivan Shishkin, Misty Morning, 1897

Here is another S-shape used to depict the path. The tops of the trees on the left form an implied line. There is a sense of balance between the small trees on the left and the dominant tree on the right.

Ivan Shishkin, Rye, 1878
Ivan Shishkin, Rye, 1878

Shishkin was a master of painting vast numbers, like the snow-capped forest in Winter. Whilst he did not simplify in terms of detail, he did simplify the composition. Notice how the painting can be broken into four distinct areas (refer to my draw-over below the painting).

Ivan Shishkin, Winter, 1890
Ivan Shishkin, Winter, 1890
Ivan Shishkin, Winter, 1890 (Segments)

Shishkin did mix it up from time to time, painting unusual compositions like The Tops of the Pines or Felled Birch.

Ivan Shishkin, The Tops of the Pines, 1890
Ivan Shishkin, The Tops of the Pines, 1890
Ivan Shishkin, Felled Birch, 1864
Ivan Shishkin, Felled Birch, 1864

Other Works

Here are some other personal favorites, starting with Pine Trees Illuminated by the Sun. A beautiful demonstration of color variance. Look at the way he painted the ground: greens, yellows, reds with varied brushwork. Effortless realism.

Ivan Shishkin, Pine Trees Illuminated by the Sun, 1886
Ivan Shishkin, Pine Trees Illuminated by the Sun, 1886

A View of the Beach is a relaxed painting, perhaps one of his studies. Simple, charming, and a strong composition. It is also interesting to see him venture outside of “detail” mode.

Ivan Shishkin, A View of the Beach
Ivan Shishkin, A View of the Beach

The unfinished work below provides insight into his painting process. If I had to guess, I would say he was methodical in his approach; painting one area to near completion then moving onto the next.

Ivan Shishkin, Pine Forest. Unfinished Sketch, c.1894
Ivan Shishkin, Pine Forest. Unfinished Sketch, c.1894

Rain in an Oak Forest-a moody painting. You can see Shishkin’s propensity for detail in the background. No amount of mist and rain could stop him from rendering each tree.

The reason I selected this painting is the way he painted the grass, of all things. Subtle changes in color saturation, varied brushwork, and small patches of detail.

Ivan Shishkin, Rain in an Oak Forest
Ivan Shishkin, Rain in an Oak Forest

Here is a close-up to give you a better look:

Ivan Shishkin, Rain in an Oak Forest (Close-Up)

The Rocky Landscape demonstrates how to capture depth and atmosphere. Notice the reduction in color and detail as things recede into the distance.

Ivan Shishkin, The Rocky Landscape
Ivan Shishkin, The Rocky Landscape

Teutoburg Forest-perhaps my favorite. Vivid orange and yellow highlights, a glaring background, and deep shadows. Beautiful.

Ivan Shishkin, Teutoburg Forest, 1865
Ivan Shishkin, Teutoburg Forest, 1865

Here is one of Shishkin’s early works and a rare step outside of landscape painting.

Ivan Shishkin, Workshop on the Island of Valaam, 1860
Ivan Shishkin, Workshop on the Island of Valaam, 1860

Pine on the Sand-a simple but strong composition with interesting colors, particularly the turquoise sky.

Ivan Shishkin, Pine on the Sand, 1884
Ivan Shishkin, Pine on the Sand, 1884

The grayscale below reveals a powerful 2-value design.

Ivan Shishkin, Pine on the Sand, 1884 (Grayscale)

Finally, a stunning example of realistic clouds. Notice the subtle color changes and edge variance.

Ivan Shishkin, Noon, The Surroundings of Moscow, Brattsevo, 1866
Ivan Shishkin, Noon, The Surroundings of Moscow, Brattsevo, 1866

Key Takeaways

  • Find something you enjoy doing and pursue it with vigor, as Shishkin did with landscape painting.
  • Listen to the opinions of others, but do not let them dictate you. Shishkin’s parents were initially dismissive of his artistic dreams and his teachers urged him to paint something other than the landscape. What a loss it would have been had he listened.
  • Great drawing is the foundation of great painting.
  • There is no substitute for rigorous practice.
  • Shishkin had a deep appreciation for nature, and it shows through his work.
  • There is more to art than creating pretty drawings and paintings. I have no doubt art helped Shishkin endure the many tragedies he faced.
Ivan Shishkin, Ferns in the Forest. Siverskiy, 1883
Ivan Shishkin, Ferns in the Forest. Siverskiy, 1883

Additional Readings and Sources

Isaac Levitan – Artist Spotlight (another great Russian landscape painter)

Thanks for Reading!

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. I appreciate it! Feel free to share with friends.

Want to learn more about landscape painting? Check out my Landscape Painting Masterclass.

Happy painting!

Dan Scott

107 comments on “Ivan Shishkin – “Czar of the Forest””

  1. What a great article, thanks so much for doing the research and sharing. I had no idea that Russia had so many talented artists and this one in particular. So interesting!

    Reply
    • Wonderful Post! I didn’t know this great artist and I have learned more about how to create a good painting through color and composition. Furthermore, I also believe on your words: “Listen to the opinions of others but don’t let them dictate you”, and practice will make our painting better. Thanks Dan!

      Reply
    • I noticed the differences between the two paintings; Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1858 and Ivan Shishkin, View of Valaam Island, 1860. Both have the same subject matter from the same perspective and yet are so different. The latter one is, in my opinion, much better. He changed that much in two years. Did he do duplicates of other scenes, do you know?

      Reply
    • Thanks for sharing Dan. I am lost for words. It’s hard to believe that someone painted those. What a gift he had. I wish one day I can paint like that! All of his work is beautiful!
      Nivedita a beginner artist 🎨.

      Reply
  2. Da n Excellent article. THank you for sharing it with us. A question,…are all these paintings in oil or acrilic= did he also paint in watercolor? lm

    Reply
  3. Breathtaking beauty captured by a genius of shape, color and composition. Thank you for sharing the work of this man. Mildred Zinser

    Reply
  4. Thank you so much for such an interesting and informative post. Your explanations on each work is so helpful in understanding what went into it. It makes it easier to plan my own work in terms of colour tone and temperature as well as composition.

    Reply
  5. Shishkin is one of my favorite woodland draftsman. I have to admit I was ignorant of his work until about ten years ago when a stumbled across an older extensive volume with beautifully photographed drawings and paintings in the basement of the library in Lenox, Massachusetts. I poured over that book for weeks. Gorgeous line. Thank you for this article. I really enjoy the examples you have selected to talk about.

    Reply
  6. I absolutely loved your article about Ivan Shishkin. I had never heard of this artist before and am so pleased that you have introduced me to such talent and beauty. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  7. I greatly appreciate your taking the time to discuss in detail the work of yet another wonderful artist. Your explanation about the approach to painting is always very helpful in thinking about changes I might make to my paintings and thinking outside the box!!

    Reply
  8. Dan, this is wonderful. I appreciate the depth of study you applied to celebrating this master, unknown to many of us. I love your whole series of tips and comments on the masters. Inspiring.

    Reply
  9. Dear Dan,

    Thank you so much for such stunning work.
    Do you ever use him or others for your own inspiration ? By that I mean do you ever look at something he has done and do your own version so to speak?
    You are so generous to share with others these kinds of examples of great artist that most of us would never hear of.
    Thank you again,
    Dee

    Reply
  10. Yes, I’ve always felt that the Russian artists are underrated by the establishment. Very nice inclusive article, thanks.

    Reply
  11. Thank you for your article on Ivan Shiskin, and the wonderful reproductions. They are very inspiring, but so detailed that you can only wonder how long they took to complete. Nevertheless his work is so inspiring. I also looked up Isaac Levitan, another great artist.

    Reply
  12. Thank you for the trouble that you go to. Each of your articles are so valuable to one who started very late and has no formal training. You go into detail to explain what the artists did. I do appreciate your time and effort.

    Reply
  13. My great love is painting trees, so it was truly exciting to find this in depth treatment of a tree artist. Through Your research on him I’ve learned a great deal about painting landscape, and trees in particular. Thank you so much for your work in presenting this information to us.

    Reply
  14. Another excellent article Dan.
    Here in Minneapolis, Minnesota, we are fortunate to have our very own Museum of Russian Art – http://www.tmora.org.
    I have also been amazed at the high quality and quantity of paintings the Russians have produced, particularly the thickness of the paint some artists in the museum here applied on canvas . I am not a student of Russian art or history, but I seem to recall that many of the artists were government supported, hence the unbridled use of paint. Although Shishkin seemed to be more into glazing, I’m guessing.
    Thanks for the great profiles in art I really enjoy reading them!
    Jane

    Reply
  15. Today started out as a miserable adventure into all of the rules and problems with the virus. Then I read your email. What a wonderful teacher and researcher you are. These paintings rival Andrew Wyeth who lived a few miles from me.

    Reply
  16. Thank you for this in-depth and thought provoking article. I studied this artist, taking a portion of a forest painting, but painting it in pastel. I learned a lot from the exercise. I really appreciate this master class.

    Reply
  17. Thank you Dan for such an expressive piece of writing; not only do you make us see the beauty in each painting, your emotive description enhances the experience you lead us through the Master’s work, making each journey rich with colours, details and treasures hidden behind the brushstrokes of a genius. Every article of yours reveals the artist in yourself and the detailed analyses of those Masters you admire uncovers the excellent work you do to showcase art in its entirety for the enlightenment of young, inexperienced artists, working tirelessly to one-day succeed in your footstep and those of other Masters you featured so brilliantly. Thank you for the experience and the Journey.

    Reply
  18. It helps so much to read your articles. I am fairly new to painting and at a later age. You put a lot of effort into introducing us to great artists and focusing our eyes on their techniques. Thank you for keeping us inspired.

    Reply
  19. I was in awe of Shishkin’s work. I will study it, and practice drawing, my weakness. I have always had little patience with studying the Masters, but I see great value in looking deeply into his work.
    Thank you!

    Reply
  20. Thanks for sharing Ivan Shishkin’s paintings, a wonderful artist, and your article was so informative about him and his work. It’s good to be introduced to another artist that I was unaware of. Love his work and all your comments.

    Reply
  21. i was advised when at an art exhibition to find 2 or 3 paintings that captivate me and spend time just absorbing them, but with Ivan Shishkin i think i would find that very difficult as there is so much to please. For me the pine trees would take much of my time plus those wonderful self portraits. Thank you so much for sharing the work and story of this talented artist

    Reply
  22. You , your article and the subject presented create and advances the desire to do hard work and never stop whatever comes in your way
    Thank you
    Gafoor

    Reply
  23. I have no source of good art reviews. Yours are straight forward, useful and in depth. Thank you and please continue these reviews.

    Reply
  24. Your art history lessons, instead of being presented as snooze material, are alive with material that draws you in just like a good painting. You are an artist of color but you also paint with your lessons and with the artists you research and bring to us. They are presented like picture books for adults. Each new painting a wonder to see, and each lesson a wonder to read. I know what you mean about there being something in the Russian water that produces such artists. Every time I research another aspect of art, inevitably I end up with Russian artists producing incredibly detailed works of art. I appreciate your emails. I appreciate all forms of your art and I love the subtle encouragement you provide. Thank you.

    Reply
  25. Inspiring!
    Thanks, Dan, for the generosity of your knowledge and insightful guidance helping us to become better painters .

    Reply
  26. Thanks Dan. A wonderful and inspiring article.
    Just a fraction of that skill would have me ‘over the moon’
    I shall endeavor to use the take aways

    Reply
  27. What a wonderful artist. Thoroughly enjoyed your posting. Looking at his work makes me want to give up my mediocre efforts at painting.

    Reply
  28. Thank you so much for this informative and excellent post on Ivan Shiskin. He is a new artist to me and I love his beautiful work. You have greatly enriched my very modest history in the arts and have encouraged me to paint more. I have always loved doing trees!

    Reply
  29. Thanks for the insights and for spotlighting a wonderful artist. The two self portraits communicated across the centuries. Thanks for the master class.

    Reply
  30. Dan,
    Thank you for introducing me to this amazing artist, heretofore unknown to me. Your article was informative and illustrative.
    Susan

    Reply
  31. Thank you so much for taking the time to introduce us to the work of Ivan Shishkin. It was an introduction to me — I have not seen his work before. It is stunning!!! This article will definitely go to my art info file. I look forward to more of your emails. I am now off to my studio to paint – you have given me inspiration :-)!!!

    Reply
  32. Hi Dan,
    A great painter indeed, a brave and dedicated one to.
    Imagine the dedication and courage it took for him to go on through all of that tragedy.
    I don’t think a lot of us mere mortals would have been able to stay centred enough to go on creating as he did.Kudos to a true master.
    Dave M.

    Reply
  33. Absolutely one of the most enjoyable posts…I am so fascinated by the ability to see nature so closely reproduced.
    Loved this….

    Reply
  34. Thank you Mr Scott! I am so pleased and fortunate to have found your website. I have BFA with a concentration in Studio Art and an emphasis in photography. I had only a few classes in painting and now am trying to improve my skills in this discipline of art. I am so happy to hear you put such an emphasis on drawing; I do feel it is the main building block on which any artist should build his/her skill set. Several of my best professors, no matter their medium of choice, even one of my art history professors, told me that drawing is the most important skill an artist can possess.

    Thank you for sharing your considerable knowledge and tying what you are teaching to art history. This is how I teach my students as well and I believe whatever principles or elements I am teaching them become so much clearer to them when based on an art history lesson.

    Thank you again for your commitment to furthering our knowledge of art!

    Most Sincerely,
    Susan Thorn

    Reply
  35. A fantastic resource thanks for sharing it I will refer toit often.
    Once again thanks heaps
    regards
    Warren Petherbridge

    Reply
  36. Thankyou Dan for another excellent insight into historical artists. i enjoy learning about artists I have never heard of. Your breakdown of their methods is very helpful in understanding how they worked.
    Absolutely love Ivan’s works.

    Reply
  37. A View of the Beach looks remarkably like Monet’s “Path Through the Corn at Pourville.”. Would they have seen each other’s work?

    Reply
  38. Thank you for this article. I have learnt so much, I just need to remember it all!
    One important take away for me is to do more sketching.

    Reply
  39. Oh my goodness, what a fabulous Post ! Thank you so very much Dan !. I had never heard of this artist .
    What a glorious legacy he left behind ! Absolutely beautiful paintings !
    You are so kind and generous in what you do for us Dan . It is deeply appreciated .

    Reply
  40. I didn’t knew these were painted by shishkin. I remember seeing them in a Russian animated cartoon called “masha and the bear” The exact paintings have been shown in an episode where bear goes to forest for painting and tries to recreate them. Its so good to know thanks for the post.

    Reply
  41. Hi Dan, I enjoyed this feature and thank you for helping to pull me up during this frightening time. Your columns are a godsend and always lead me down a path of further exploration. It’s been an enjoyable adventure–even if I’m not a painter. It’s all about pleasure!

    Reply
  42. Fantastic review. I got to see some of his works in a museum in Moscow. Also the morning in a pine forest painting is the signature wrapper of the most famous russian chocolate candy. The candy is called “clubfoot bears”. 🙂

    Reply
  43. Thank you for drawing attention to Shishkin, such a fantastic painter. There is a popular chocolate in Russia called “Mishka Kosolapy” which uses Shishkin’s four bears from Morning in a Pine Forest as its wrapper. (Translates to the pigeon-toed bear – Mishka being a popular colloquialism in Russian for a bear.) The Russian chocolate company Red October used many Russian paintings and also had artists to design their wrappers as part of their marketing. I always have a hard time throwing away the wrappers!

    Reply
  44. This was so interesting, thanks Dan. I picked up some reinforcements, and clues to depth. Shishkins paintings show a love of the forests of Russia, such gorgeous work.

    Reply
  45. Fascinating read about an amazing artist that I was unaware of until now.
    Thank you for the introduction – greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  46. Thank you Dan for sharing these paintings with us. So much to learn and work on our own drawing / painting.. Missed out on the information on grid that you shared. When can I expect it?

    Reply
    • Thanks for your comment! I will be resending an email over the coming days about the image tool. Thanks, Dan.

      Reply
  47. Thanks, Dan. Just the right moment in my ‘en plein air’ study.
    I’m sharing this post with my Russian painter friend. We have painted together many times over the years.

    Reply
  48. I love Russian artists. There is both depth and richness without overplay or compromise; simply stunning. I discovered on ‘russianartgallery.org’ that his student Fyodor and his wife Eugenia died of Tuberculosis. Thank you for sharing this Master!

    Reply
  49. Thank you for your introduction into the life of yet another great artist. It’s very inspiring and keeps your mind focused on art and the things you can accomplish when you take a look at how others work.

    Reply
  50. Love it. His paintings remind me of the Allagash region in northern Maine. Another superb piece of writing Dan.

    Reply
  51. Rom ,
    Hello Dan,
    First, thank You for such brilliant introducing a remarkable Painter like I. Shishkin was.
    One of most famous Nature Painters I ever seen. His Compositions and color choosing,
    are simply his unique and matchless way of painting, like a signature off him self.

    Reply
  52. Love Shishkin’s work. Thank you for your exploration of his landscapes. He certainly was a master at landscapes and other genre. I learn so much from your posts.

    Reply
  53. I enjoy your descriptions of the process. I feel like it is a refresher course to read. You are gifted in your ability to educate.

    Reply
  54. Welcome everyone! I need help and I do not know how to do it, maybe you can help me or give it to me, in short I have one picture very old, probably IVAN SHISHKIN performance, which does not have a signature, I want to establish its reality, I have a few questions!
    1: Can an artist paint two identical pictures?
    2: If the picture can be original and not signed?
    My picture is done with oil on canvas. Where and how can it be determined?

    Reply
  55. I’ve enjoyed this article so much! Thank you. The Itinerants had interesting partners too in the fields of literature and revolution.

    Reply
  56. Thank you for this comprehensive article on Shiskin. His work is somewhat new to me and I enjoy seeing more of it. Your comments are well taken and I will give some thought to it. I do not agree with his contemporary critics. I think his work is far from being a “craft”. He puts his heart and soul into his work. You can see the meticulous, almost maniacal interest in form in his drawings which I also love.

    Reply
  57. Thanks Dan – what a fantastic artist that was unknown to me and a style that I strive to achieve. His use of light is wonderful. Great inspiration in these photos.

    Reply

Leave a Comment

[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]