Visit to the Queensland Art Gallery

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I recently visited the Queensland Art Gallery for the first time since I was a child. In my opinion, it was not as impressive as the Art Gallery of New South Wales, but there were still some beautiful paintings worth seeing by artists such as Sir Arthur Streeton and Edgar Degas.

I will walk you through some of the paintings from the gallery for those of you who are unable to make it in person, starting with some stunning works by Streeton:

Arthur Streeton, St. Mark's, Venice, 1908
Arthur Streeton, St. Mark’s, Venice, 1908

I always enjoy seeing Streeton’s paintings in person. I particularly love his high-key landscapes, like the one below which depicts a moonlit Magnetic Island.

Arthur Streeton, Magnetic Island (Moonlight, Magnetic Island), 1924
Arthur Streeton, Magnetic Island (Moonlight, Magnetic Island), 1924

Here is another high-key painting by Charles Condor which seems to depict the harsh, midday sun. In person, these colors seem to almost shimmer in the light of the gallery.

Tip: Many people think that more light always means more color. But, when there is a very strong, direct light source (like the midday sun), colors tend to appear tinted.

Charles Conder, Fruit Trees in Blossom, Algiers, 1892
Charles Conder, Fruit Trees in Blossom, Algiers, 1892

The two paintings below were the first works I have seen from Emanuel Phillips Fox. What a great eye for color he had. Notice how the apple blossoms blend in with the sky. These subtle connections can add a level sophistication to a painting.

Emanuel Phillips Fox, Apple Blossom, c.1905
Emanuel Phillips Fox, Apple Blossom, c.1905

The painting below reminds me of Joaquín Sorolla’s work. Notice how the area in shadow is not actually that dark; it is more around the middle-value range. This is known as a compressed value range.

Emanuel Phillips Fox, Bathing Hour (L'Heure Du Bain), c.1909
Emanuel Phillips Fox, Bathing Hour (L’Heure Du Bain), c.1909

It was pleasing to see one of Edgar Degas’ famous Dancer paintings. It looks like pastel work, but it was actually done in oils. As with much of Degas’ work, there is a strong use of outlining and broken color which gives the painting a very stylistic feel.

Edgar Degas, Trois Danseuses à La Classe De Dance (Three Dancers at a Dance Class), c.1880-1890
Edgar Degas, Trois Danseuses à La Classe De Dance (Three Dancers at a Dance Class), c.1880-1890

Below is a beautiful depiction of the Australian landscape, with the distant mountains basked in light from the sun. It looks as though this was painted late in the afternoon, just before the sun fades. All kinds of wonderful pinks, purples, reds, and yellows come out during this time of day.

Eugene von Guérard, A View from Mount Franklin Towards Mount Kooroocheang and the Pyrenees, c.1864
Eugene von Guérard, A View from Mount Franklin Towards Mount Kooroocheang and the Pyrenees, c.1864

Below is a clever display of oil paint, pearl, and stone by Frank Marriott.

Frank Pickford Marriott, Love in Her Eyes Sits Playing, 1902
Frank Pickford Marriott, Love in Her Eyes Sits Playing, 1902
George Wishart, A Busy Corner of the Brisbane River, 1897
George Wishart, A Busy Corner of the Brisbane River, 1897

The painting below looks like a basic study by the famous Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. That frame is impressive though.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Head of a Girl (Tète De Fille), 1892
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Head of a Girl (Tète De Fille), 1892
Hilda Rix Nicholas, The Fair Musterer, 1935
Hilda Rix Nicholas, The Fair Musterer, 1935

Below is a panoramic view of Brisbane (where I live) when it was far less developed. This painting is very large and the photo does not do it justice. Joseph Clarke was one of Queensland’s first professional artists and teachers.

Joseph Augustus Clarke, Panorama of Brisbane, 1880
Joseph Augustus Clarke, Panorama of Brisbane, 1880

I mostly paint landscapes, but I do appreciate a great portrait painting like the one below.

Josephine Müntz-Adams, Care, c.1893
Josephine Müntz-Adams, Care, c.1893
Louis Buvelot, The Wannon Falls, 1868
Louis Buvelot, The Wannon Falls, 1868
Louis Buvelot, The Wannon Falls, 1868 (1)

In a dark corner of the gallery, I stumbled across a moody, but probably very expensive painting by Pablo Picasso.

Pablo Picasso, La Belle Hollandaise, 1905
Pablo Picasso, La Belle Hollandaise, 1905

Below is a simple composition, featuring a tree with vivid, red flowers amongst the landscape. Richard Rivers, who was president of the Queensland Art Society from 1892 – 1901, used impasto (thick) paint to draw your attention towards the red-flowered tree.

Richard Godfrey Rivers, An Alien in Australia, 1904
Richard Godfrey Rivers, An Alien in Australia, 1904

Finally, one of the many grand landscapes by William Charles Piguenit, who was one of the earliest professional painters from Australia. The Art Gallery of New South Wales featured many more of his paintings.

William Charles Piguenit, Valley of the Grose, 1876
William Charles Piguenit, Valley of the Grose, 1876

I hope you enjoyed this virtual journey through the Queensland Art Gallery. There were many other paintings which are not featured in this post, so I urge you to visit the gallery for yourself if you get a chance.

Want to Learn More?

You might be interested in my Painting Academy course. I’ll walk you through the time-tested fundamentals of painting. It’s perfect for absolute beginner to intermediate painters.

Thanks for Reading!

I appreciate you taking the time to read this post and I hope you found it helpful. Feel free to share it with friends.

Happy painting!

Dan Scott

Draw Paint Academy

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29 comments on “Visit to the Queensland Art Gallery”

  1. Thanks so much. I enjoyed this tour through the gallery. More! More! Lee Bourlet
    Ottawa Ontario, capital city of Canada.

    Reply
  2. So lovely and such a variety of choices to share with us. I enjoy your explainations you give us that you do with all your posts

    Reply
  3. I enjoyed your comments, such as choice of value in the shadow, or lost edges on trees. Thanks for your posts

    Reply
  4. Thank you for sharing these beautiful paintings. I enjoyed them very much. Also thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. I look forward to your tutorials everyday.

    Reply
  5. Thanks. The painting by Hilda Rix Nicholas, The Fair Musterer seemed to jump off the screen. Hey what is a Musterer?

    Reply
  6. Your commentary on the works of art are very much appreciated as it draws my attention to the aspects to consider on each painting. Please don’t underestimate how valuable that is in the total enjoyment of each art piece. Thank you.

    Reply

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